Skip to content

Programs : Brochure

This page is the brochure for your selected program. You can view the provided information for this program on this page and click on the available buttons for additional options.
  • Locations: London, England
  • Program Terms: Fall: WFU House, Spring: WFU House
Dates / Deadlines:
Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Spring: WFU House 2022 09/15/2021 ** Rolling Admission TBA TBA
Fall: WFU House 2022 10/15/2021 10/15/2021 TBA TBA
Spring: WFU House 2023 10/15/2021 10/15/2021 TBA TBA

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of acceptance into this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.
Program Description:

Discover London at the Worrell House

Each fall and spring semester, a group of Wake Forest students and a Resident Professor live and study together at Worrell House. Students marvel at the extension of the classroom into the city of London. Courses integrate visits to art galleries, theater performances, historical sites, and musical productions. All students take five courses that are taught at Worrell House. Three courses are taught by British professors and usually include Art History, History, and Theater. In addition, the Wake Forest Resident Professor teaches two courses from his/her discipline. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, leaving a three-day weekend for exploring the city or travel to other destinations.
Worrell house classroom Worrell House study St Paul's Cathedral Big Ben London Worrell house kitchen Worrell house kitchen2 London sunset
<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Firjla4mWrk" width="560"></iframe> <iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8cTNifqHmTQ" width="560"></iframe>
<iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8cTNifqHmTQ" width="560"></iframe>
Overview Each fall and spring semester, a group of Wake Forest students and a Resident Professor live and study together at Worrell House. Students marvel at the extension of the classroom into the city of London. Courses integrate visits to art galleries, theater performances, historical sites, and musical productions. All students take five courses that are taught at Worrell House. Three courses are taught by British professors and usually include Art History, History, and Theater. In addition, the Wake Forest Resident Professor teaches two courses from his/her discipline. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, leaving a three-day weekend for exploring the city or travel to other destinations.
Location London is one of Europe's largest and most cosmopolitan cities. Its famous sites include Buckingham Palace, the Tower of London, Trafalgar Square, Picadilly Circus, and Westminster Abbey. With a multitude of art galleries, museums, and pubs, London is endlessly interesting. The underground rail "tube" system provides easy access to all parts of the city. Students may conveniently visit Canterbury, Oxford, Bath, Dover, and other destinations (Scotland and Wales) via the excellent British railway system.

In 1977, Wake Forest purchased a large brick house in Hampstead for its London program. The house, a gift from Eugene and Ann Worrell, was named in their honor. Formerly known as Morven House, the building served as the home and studio of landscape painter Charles Edward Johnson.

Worrell House has four stories and is situated on Steele's Road (named for essayist Sir Richard Steele) in a sector of suburban London known as Hampstead. Hampstead is primarily a residential neighborhood and home to Hampstead Heath, Regent's Park, Primrose Hill, and the Keats Cottage. Two underground tube stops are within a 5-10 minute walk.
Program Each fall and spring semester, a group of Wake Forest students and a Resident Professor live and study together at Worrell House. Students marvel at the extension of the classroom into the city of London. Courses integrate visits to art galleries, theater performances, historical sites, and musical productions. All students take five courses that are taught at Worrell House. Three courses are taught by British professors and usually include Art History, History, and Theater. In addition, the Wake Forest Resident Professor teaches two courses from his/her discipline. Classes are scheduled Monday through Thursday, leaving a three-day weekend for exploring the city or travel to other destinations. 



It is the student’s responsibility to speak to their major and minor advisor(s) regarding their abroad coursework and how (or if) it will count towards their degree plan.
 

Standard Courses

ART 235 Art in London (3h) (D)
Survey of English painting, sculpture, and architecture in the Georgian, Victorian, and modern periods. Includes weekly prepaid gallery tours guided by a professor.

HST 226 History of London (3h)
Topographical, social, economic, and political history of London from the earliest times. Lectures, student papers and reports, museum visits and lectures. Includes guided city walks, enabling students to gain a greater understanding of the content of the course.

THE 266 Modern English and Continental Drama and the London Stage (3h) (D)
Studies the works of major playwrights of England and Europe from 1875 to the present. Includes prepaid tickets to at least twelve productions of classic plays currently being presented in London theaters. May also include an excursion to Stratford-upon-Avon to view a classical Shakespearian performance.
This course is cross listed as ENG 347 which can count as English major/minor credit or English divisional credit.

POL 234 United Kingdom Politics in a Global Age (3h) (CD)
Introduces the nature and content of contemporary United Kingdom politics by placing those politics in a wider analysis of United Kingdom history, society, and international positions.

Fall 2021 with Dr. Raisur Rahman, History

HST 109 Asia and the World (D, CD)
Overview of Asia (primarily East, Southeast, and South Asia) since 1500 with emphasis on economic, diplomatic, cultural, and religious interactions with the outside world. 

HST 385 History through Film: Bollywood and the Making of Modern India.
Juxtaposes historical films made by the world's largest film industry base out of Bombay/Mumbai with textural primary sources and secondary historical works and seeks to understand films as both interpretations and sources of history. Explores specific themes such as nation, gender, caste, and community that are critical to understanding modern Indian and South Asian history and culture. Elective towards four majors/minors: History, Film and Media Studies, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies as well as Middle East and South Asia Studies.

Spring 2022 with Dr. Christa Colyer, Chemistry

CHM 280 College Chemistry II
This is a required course for Chemistry majors, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology majors, and it is an elective course for Chemistry minors. In addition, it is required by most health professions programs, and so our pre-health students (who plan to attend medical school, dental school, etc. following graduation) also take this class. The lecture course CHM 280 is decoupled from the lab course CHM 280L (1 h), and so students could complete the laboratory at any point when they return to the Reynolda campus after studying at the Worrell House. It is important to note that students typically enroll in CHM 280 during the spring semester of their sophomore year (since it constitutes the last course in a four-semester sequence of introductory chemistry offerings at Wake), and it is during this very semester that Chemistry majors and pre-med students are most likely to be able to study away without interfering with their ability to complete other highly sequenced courses in various science major programs in the junior and senior years of study.
 
CHM 351 Special Topics in Chemistry 
This course is an elective for Chemistry majors and minors. The Chemistry Department has approved several special topics, including the History of Chemistry (previously taught by Dr. Paul Jones), which would be ideally suited to study in London. The United Kingdom dominated the realm of scientific advancement from the 1700s (with such discoveries as that of oxygen by Joseph Priestley) to the mid-1900s (with the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA by Watson & Crick). This rich scientific history, coupled with very significant divergence in British science culture and policy relative to American science culture and policy in recent years (regarding such issues as global climate change and stem cell research, for example) makes the location of the Worrell House ideal for this proposed course offering.
 

Fall 2022 with Dr. Matthew Phillips, Business

BEM 261: Legal Environment of Business is a required course for all School of Business undergraduate students which can also serve as an elective course for non-business students. Beginning with the foundations and structures of law, most of which originated in Britain, students will explore the key disciplines of law—property, contract, tort, employment, and business organizations—in order to understand how law supports individual rights, community interests, and a productive economy. Practical examples—many of them in London—will illustrate the function as well as the development of law, meaning that students will be able to anticipate and plan as the law develops around them during their careers.

BEM 365: Ethics and Business Leadership (3h)
An interdisciplinary exploration of ethics applied to business. Lectures, readings, and case-based approach introduce the necessary background information. Examples of ethical and unethical situations are used to develop an understanding of how an efficient and effective business can also be ethical.

Spring 2023 with Dr. Melissa Maffeo, Psychology

PSY 243: Biopsychology (3h) (D) 
Biopsychology is the study of how our biology affects how we think, feel, and make decisions. Not surprisingly, a large emphasis is placed on the brain. In this class, we will approach biopsychology in four separate, but overlapping, themes: Introduction to biopsychology (how neurons communicate with each other), interacting with the world (how our bodies and brains perceive external experiences), internal regulation (how our brain regulates things like hormonal regulation, food intake and sleep), and cognition (how our brains control our thinking, and when that goes wrong). An overarching theme that we will discuss all semester is that of neuroplasticity, or the ability of our brain to change in response to experiences. Sometimes change is a good thing, but not always.  Psychology and Neuroscience minor credit  

PSY 322: Psychopharmacology (3h) (D)
Pharmacology is the scientific study of the actions of drugs and their effects on a living organism. By contrast, psychopharmacology is the study of how the actions of drugs influence things like mood, thinking, and behavior. In this class, we will learn about how the study of psychopharmacology can help educate about important societal issues, such as addiction and use of pharmacotherapies. By taking this class, you will develop language to talk, not only about how drugs interact with the brain and change behavior, but also about issues related to drugs in society. Psychology and Neuroscience minor credit  
Faculty Resident Professor
Fall 2021: Dr. Raisur Rahman, History, rahmanmr@wfu.edu
Spring 2022: Dr. Christa Colyer, Chemistry, colyercl@wfu.edu
Fall 2022: Dr. Matthew Phillips, Business, phillimt@wfu.edu
Spring 2023: Dr. Melissa  Maffeo, Psychology, masicaml@wfu.edu
Accommodations Worrell House accommodates fourteen students. There are five student bedrooms, four bathrooms, a large kitchen, a student lounge, a living room, two libraries, and a seminar room. Modern kitchen facilities are available, and students often prefer to cook their meals together in the house. The house is wired for Internet access and students should bring their laptop computers. The living room, called the Churchill Room, was named in honor of the former prime minister and statesman. His daughter, Sarah Churchill, unveiled a bust of Churchill at the 1977 dedication of the house. A beautiful English garden is located behind the house. There is a ground floor apartment (flat) for the Resident Professor consisting of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a kitchen.
Excursions  
Selection The Resident Professor is responsible for selecting each group based on the following criteria:
  • Academic suitability
  • Social and emotional maturity
  • Classification (seniors given some priority)
  • Seriousness of the student in pursuing the academic and cultural aims of the program
  • Applicability of the program to the student's interests and studies
  • Majors in all disciplines are eligible.
Costs Students pay current Wake Forest tuition and housing fees. Students are responsible for all meals, round-trip airfare, additional travel, books, and other personal expenses.
Scholarships Special scholarships for study at Worrell House are available through the David Hadley/Worrell House Scholarship Fund, the Ivy Hixson Fund, and the Hubert Humphrey Studies Abroad Scholarship. Students may apply for additional scholarships through the Center for Global Programs and Studies.
Contact Dr. Mary Dalton
Program Director of the Worrell House and Professor of Communication
Phone: (336) 758 6120
Email: dalton@wfu.edu

Jessica Francis
Director for Study Abroad
Reynolda Hall, Room 116
Phone: (336) 758 3890
E-mail: francija@wfu.edu

House Address:
Worrell House
36 Steele's Road
Hampstead
London NW3 4RG
England
Phone: 011-44-207-722-3808
Fax: 011-44-207-722-2496
Testimonials