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  • Locations: Venice, Italy
  • Program Terms: Summer
  • Homepage: Click to visit
  • This program is currently not accepting applications.
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Program Description:

ANT 111: People and Culture of Venice

Venice is a vibrant and complex city, steeped in history and culture.  Veneto culture is not one thing but many, representing residents of myriad backgrounds and visitors from across the globe who outnumber the residents.  And, of course, the cultures of Venice are connected to places near and far, Italian and otherwise.  In this course, we will take a deep dive into the cultures of Venice through readings, lectures and discussion.  But our main classroom will be Venice itself.  We will look at a wide range of cultural themes ranging from the arts to the mundane tasks of daily living, like doing the laundry, from religious ideals to political contests.  And so on.  At the same time, we will take one aspect of Venetian and Italian culture and trace its cultural links to a variety of people, places and practices.  The fashion, garment, fabric industry, we will explore in Prato where Chinese immigrants supply much of the labor for the manufacture of cloth. In Venice, we will investigate the clothing industry, fashion retailers, fabric boutiques and yes, doing the laundry.
Casa ArtomCasa ArtomVenice panorama
Overview ANT 111(D): People and Cultures of Venice

Venice is a vibrant and complex city, steeped in history and culture.  Veneto culture is not one thing but many, representing residents of myriad backgrounds and visitors from across the globe who outnumber the residents.  And, of course, the cultures of Venice are connected to places near and far, Italian and otherwise.  In this course, we will take a deep dive into the cultures of Venice through readings, lectures and discussion.  But our main classroom will be Venice itself.  We will look at a wide range of cultural themes ranging from the arts to the mundane tasks of daily living, like doing the laundry, from religious ideals to political contests.  And so on.  At the same time, we will take one aspect of Venetian and Italian culture and trace its cultural links to a variety of people, places and practices.  The fashion, garment, fabric industry, we will explore in Prato where Chinese immigrants supply much of the labor for the manufacture of cloth. In Venice, we will investigate the clothing industry, fashion retailers, fabric boutiques and yes, doing the laundry.

 
Location Surrounded by water, Venice is an enchanting city built on 117 small islands. Its magnificent sights are best seen by walking along the narrow streets, crossing the many canals, and meandering through the piazzas. Piazza San Marco, Palazzo Ducale, and the Rialto bridge are three among numerous sites that make Venice an unforgettable city. In addition, Wake Forest students may conveniently explore on their own other parts of Italy such as Rome, Florence, Pompeii, Sicily among others.

In 1971, the University, with the assistance of Graham Martin, Ambassador to Italy and Wake Forest alumnus, leased the building that formerly housed the American Consulate. In 1974, the building was purchased by Wake Forest and named Casa Artom in honor of Dr. Camillo Artom, a professor at the Baptist Medical Center until 1969. His wife, Bianca Ara Artom, taught Italian at Wake Forest for many years and served as the director of Casa Artom during the summers until her death in 1994.

Casa Artom is a magnificent two-story building facing the Grand Canal. It is flanked by the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, which houses the Peggy Guggenheim art collection, and the magnificent 15th century home Ca'Dario.
Academics ANT 111, People and Cultures of Venice (D)
 
You and Dr. Steve Folmar will explore the rich culture of Venice together.  Our main classroom will be in the streets, cafes, shops, theaters and churches of Venice.  Our approach will be to get beneath the veneer of the typical tourist encounter to the degree we can.  Students will be encouraged, expected to interact with locals and tourists, to engage in conversation and observe what people do.  In cafes, why not chat with the waiter?  Instead of simply touring a church, go to church and observe how religious services are conducted.  Discuss a painting with the artist who produced it.  Inquire of a fabric shopkeeper where the cloth comes from, how it is printed and priced.  And, yes, do laundry.  We will also, of course, have regular class meetings in the house, discussing our experiences and relating them to the readings we will do.  And, we will have an enlightening excursion to Prato.
Faculty
Dr. Steve Folmar
Associate Professor of Anthropology
Email: folmarsj@wfu.edu
336-758-6065
 
Accommodation Casa Artom can accommodate 18 students. There are eleven bedrooms, a library, classrooms, a dining room, a living room, two kitchens, a patio, and an open courtyard. Modern kitchen facilities are available, and students often prefer to cook their meals together in the house. The house is wired for Internet access and students may bring their laptop computers. The faculty director has a suite upstairs consisting of two bedrooms and a bath. Washers and dryers are available in the laundry room. Casa Artom is conveniently located close to the Academia, the Guggenheim Museum, churches, restaurants, coffee houses, and small grocery stores. Participants reside at Casa Artom where they will share rooms with other students.
 
Excursions Prato. In addition to several mini-excursions we will take in and around Venice, we will travel to Prato in Tuscany.  It is about 2 ½ hours by train and near Florence.  We will stay two nights so that we have one full day to explore Prato, the major textile center of Europe.  Included in the labor force is a significant group of immigrant Chinese laborers.  Their story is told by Betsy Kraus in an ethnography assigned for class: Tight knit: global families and the social life of fast fashion.  On our excursion day, we will tour the fabric district as a group for the morning and students will be left on their own in the afternoon to follow up on their own interests.  We depart the following morning.
 
Selection The resident professor is responsible for the selection of each group based on the following criteria:

*Academic suitability
*Social and emotional maturity
*Seriousness of the student in pursuing the academic and cultural aims of the program
 
Costs
The total cost of summer study abroad can be broken down into four categories:

*Program Fee - Usually covers room, in-country travel, excursions, some meals and other costs associated with the program.
*Tuition – Students on WFU summer programs pay WFU summer school tuition per credit hour. The 2021 summer rate was $900/per credit hour. Expect a small increase for summer 2022.
*Airfare – Varies per location. Students are responsible for their own airfare unless otherwise noted.
*Personal Expenses – These will vary depending on the students' spending habits, cost of living in the destination country, and the number of meals included in the program fee. This may also include visa fees, vaccinations, academic supplies/books and other miscellaneous daily expenses.

Program Fee (estimated) - $3,300
Tuition (3hrs) -$2,700
Airfare (estimated) - $1,600
Personal Expenses (estimated) - $1,000
Estimated total cost - $8,600
 
Scholarships Scholarships are available through the Center for Global Programs and Studies.
Contact Dr. Steve Folmar
Associate Professor of Anthropology
Email: folmarsj@wfu.edu
336-758-6065

Mike Tyson
Assistant Director for Study Abroad: Summer and Short Term Programs
tysonmj@wfu.edu
336-758-5938

House Address
Casa Artom
Dorsoduro 699
San Gregorio
30123 Venice, Italy
Phone: 011-39-041-522-2709
Fax: 011-39-041-522-0277
Testimonials [text]



This program is currently not accepting applications.